Simon Brett rejoins us for part two of our Comics and Strips special in which we continue looking at Doctor Who comic strips and other comics of our youth and later.

We’d also like to draw your attention to “Regenerations”, a charitable anthology to which Simon has contributed and which has now been confirmed as coming out on 3rd August and can be pre-ordered now at this link. 

“Something has gone very wrong with time! The Time Lord formerly known as the Doctor has been fighting the Time War for as long as he can recall. His previous lives — all those triumphs and tragedies — have been boxed up and filed away, too painful to revisit. That is until something — or someone — begins tugging at the thread of the Doctor’s past. As familiar stories twist and shift, threatening the stability of the universe itself, the reluctant Warrior finds himself with only one option. He has to save the Doctor.”

“Published by Chinbeard Books, “Regenerations” has been written to raise money for “Invest in ME”. It is a non-profit, unofficial, charity anthology – with no copyright infringement intended. Nobody involved is taking a fee for their time or talent.

P.S. A lovely promo vid can be seen at this separate link.

 

Direct Download Link = DDPC137 – Comics & Strips (part 2)

 

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SHOWNOTES

(00:00:00) Our guest on this podcast is Simon Brett, formerly of the Blue Box Podcast and currently of the Strangers in Space Podcast. Simon can be found on Twitter here and on Facebook here and his writing and artwork can be found on his blog here.

(00:00:02) The theme of our introductory scene is, of course taken from “Simon in the Land of Chalk Drawings”, a British children’s animated series about the adventures of a young boy named Simon, who has a magic blackboard. Things that Simon draws on the chalkboard become real in the Land of Chalk Drawings, which Simon can enter by climbing over a fence near his home with a ladder. The stories often revolve around the unintended effects that Simon’s drawings have on the Land of Chalk Drawings, such as when an upset Simon draws a picture of his angry self, which goes on a rampage. The series was narrated by Bernard Cribbins. The episode in question is episode 1 “Simon Meets Henry”.

(00:02:35) Proof that Hayden did visit the “Quadrophenia” alleyway in Brighton can  be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:05:50) “The Infinity Gauntlet” is an American comic book storyline published by Marvel Comics, consisting of an eponymous, six-issue limited series written by Jim Starlin and pencilled by George Pérez and Ron Lim, that was published from July to December 1991, and a number of tie-in books into which the storyline crossed over. Samples of frames and artwork can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:06:50) “Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars”, commonly known as “Secret Wars”, is a twelve-issue American comic book crossover limited series published from May 1984 to April 1985 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Jim Shooter with art by Mike Zeck and Bob Layton. Samples of frames and artwork can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:06:50) “The Amazing Spider-Man” is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, featuring Spider-Man as its main protagonist. Being in the mainstream continuity of the franchise, it began publication in 1963 as a monthly periodical and was published continuously, with a brief interruption in 1995, until its relaunch with a new numbering order in 1999. Samples of frames and artwork can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:06:50) “The Galactus Trilogy” is a 1966 three-issue comic book story arc that appeared in “Fantastic Four” #48-50. Written, plotted and drawn by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee for Marvel Comics, it introduced the characters Galactus and the Silver Surfer. Samples of frames and artwork can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:06:50) “Deadpool” is a comic book anti-hero in the Marvel Comics Universe. Since 1993 he has starred in several ongoing series, as well as a number of limited series and one-shots. 

(00:06:50) “Deadpool: The Dead Presidents” is from the Third Series (2013) #1-6 of “Deadpool”. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:06:50) “Deadpool: The Good The Bad and The Ugly” is from the Third Series (2013) #13-19 of “Deadpool”. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:07:10) “Daredevil: The Man Without Fear” is a 1993 five-issue comic book miniseries starring Daredevil, written by Frank Miller, illustrated by John Romita Jr. and published by Marvel Comics. The series explores the origins of the hero Daredevil. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:07:15) “Daredevil: Born Again” is a 1986 comic book story arc that appeared in the Marvel Comics series “Daredevil”. Written by Frank Miller, and drawn by David Mazzucchelli, the storyline first appeared in Daredevil #227–231. It was later reprinted in graphic novel format along with the previous issue #226, and a follow-up story arc from Daredevil #232–233, which resolves some loose ends from the original story arc. Because of this, this follow-up story arc has become generally considered part of “Born Again”. The story details Daredevil’s descent into insanity and destitution at the Kingpin’s hands, as well as a subsequent struggle to build a new life for himself. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:12:17) “X-Men: The Dark Phoenix Saga” is an extended X-Men storyline in the fictional Marvel Comics Universe, focusing on Jean Grey and the Phoenix Force. It was written by Chris Claremont with art by John Byrne. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:12:17) “X-Men: Days of Future Past” is a storyline in the Marvel Comics comic book “The Uncanny X-Men” issues #141–142, published in 1981. It deals with a dystopian future in which mutants are incarcerated in internment camps. An adult Kate Pryde transfers her mind into her younger self, the present-day Kitty Pryde, who brings the X-Men to prevent a fatal moment in history that triggers anti-mutant hysteria. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:13:00) Marvel Unlimited – Unlock the Marvel Universe. Start your 7-day free trial and get access to over 27,000 digital comics, then only $9.99/month. Cancel Anytime.

(00:14:05) The “Teen Titans” are a fictional superhero team appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, often in an eponymous monthly series. As the group’s name suggests, the members are teenage superheroes, many of whom have acted as sidekicks to DC’s premier superheroes in the Justice League. The original team later becomes known as the Titans when the members age out of their teenage years, while the Teen Titans name is continued by subsequent generations of young heroes. First appearing in 1964 in The Brave and the Bold #54, the team was formed by Kid Flash (Wally West), Robin (Dick Grayson), and Aqualad (Garth) before adopting the name Teen Titans in issue 60 with the addition of Wonder Girl (Donna Troy) to their ranks. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:15:40) “Marvel Team-Up” is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics. The series featured two or more Marvel characters in one story. The series was originally published from March 1972 through February 1985, and featured Spider-Man as the lead “team-up” character in all but ten of its 150 issues, and in six of its seven Annuals. Edition #59 features a team-up between Spider-Man, Yellow Jacket and The Wasp vs Equinox. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:16:05) “Super-Villain Team-Up” is the name of two American comic book series published by Marvel Comics. Both series featured supervillains as the protagonists. The first series started in 1975 with two giant-size issues before launching as a regular series, and was mostly bi-monthly during its existence. It initially teamed up Doctor Doom and the Sub-Mariner, who had lost his own series. Edition #5 features a team-up between Doctor Doom and The Sub-mariner vs the Fantastic Four. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:18:00) “Batman: Year One” is an American comic book story arc published by DC Comics which recounts the superhero Batman’s first year as a crime-fighter. It was written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David Mazzucchelli, colored by Richmond Lewis, and lettered by Todd Klein. Batman: Year One originally appeared in issues #404–407 of the comic book title Batman in 1987. As well as recounting Batman’s beginnings and early years in his crime-fighting career, the story simultaneously examines the life of recently transferred Gotham police detective James Gordon – eventually building towards their first encounter and their eventual alliance against Gotham’s criminal underworld. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:18:00) “Batman: The Cult” is a four-issue comic book mini-series. It was published by DC Comics in their prestige format books and released in 1988. It was written by Jim Starlin, illustrated by Bernie Wrightson, colored by Bill Wray and edited by Denny O’Neil. The story follows the machinations of Deacon Blackfire and his band of homeless followers who have kidnapped Batman before the events of this story. Following a lengthy period of captivity Batman slowly succumbs to brainwashing. Batman is eventually freed from the cult but takes a long time to recover from his treatment at their hands. The story also delves into other territory. Gotham City politicians are assassinated by Blackfire’s party of followers. An attempt on Commissioner Gordon’s life is tried by Blackfire’s group, leaving the commissioner in a hospital. Beyond Gotham authorities to protect the city, the national guard is called in, then the military and martial law is declared on Gotham. The series also features the second Robin, Jason Todd. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:18:00) “Batman: The Long Halloween” is a 13-issue American comic book limited series written by Jeph Loeb with art by Tim Sale. It was originally published by DC Comics in 1996 and 1997. Taking place during Batman’s early days of crime fighting, “The Long Halloween” tells the story of a mysterious killer named Holiday, who murders people on holidays, one each month. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:18:12) “Batman: Death in the Family” is a four-issue, 1988 Batman comic book storyline published by DC Comics. The story was written by Jim Starlin and illustrated by Jim Aparo, while Mike Mignola designed each cover. The story follows Jason Todd/Robin’s quest to be reunited with his birth mother after being relieved of his duties by Batman. During his journey, however, the Joker kidnaps and tortures him, eventually killing him. The storyline is notable for its 900 number voting system, in which fans were allowed to call two separate numbers and chose whether Jason would survive the Joker’s torture or die because of it. Over 10,000 votes were cast, with a narrow majority in favor of killing the character. Frames and artwork and the phone poll advert related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:21:20) Jonathan Hickman (born September 3, 1972) is an American comic book writer and artist. He is known for creating the Image Comics series The Nightly News, The Manhattan Projects and East of West, as well as working on Marvel Comics’ Fantastic Four, FF, and S.H.I.E.L.D. titles. In 2012, Hickman ended his run on the Fantastic Four titles to write The Avengers and The New Avengers, as part the “Marvel NOW!” relaunch. In 2013, Hickman wrote a six-part miniseries, Infinity, plus Avengers tie-ins for Marvel Comics. In 2015, he wrote the crossover event Secret Wars.

(00:21:47) “Crisis on Infinite Earths” is an American comic book published by DC Comics. The series, written by Marv Wolfman and pencilled by George Pérez, was first serialized as a 12-issue limited series from April 1985 to March 1986. As the main piece of a crossover event, some plot elements were featured in tie-in issues of other publications. Since its initial publication, the series has been reprinted in various formats and editions. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:43:05) John Ridgway is a British comics artist who began his career initially as a hobby, drawing D.C.Thompson’s Commando War Stories alongside professional work as a design engineer. In 1984 Ridgway became a full-time professional, broadening his employment to include 2000 AD, Guttenberghus, Marvel Comics and DC Comics.

(00:43:05) Frobisher is a fictional character who appeared in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip in the 1980s. He was a companion of the Sixth and Seventh Doctors. Frobisher is a Whifferdill, one of a shape-changing extraterrestrial race. What is assumed to be his natural form, as seen in his first comic strip appearance, is humanoid, pale yellow in colour, three to four feet in height, with a round, featureless head, and wearing spectacles. However, he preferred to spend his free time in the form of a penguin.

(00:45:20) “Once Upon a Time-Lord” was a Sixth Doctor comic strip published in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 98-99, 1985). It is notable for having several pages written out in story form with accompanying comic panels. With its end, it concluded both the Voyager and Astrolabus themes that had started in this incarnation’s second strip, “Voyager”. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:44:34) “Rupert Bear” is a children’s comic strip character created by British artist Mary Tourtel and first appearing in the Daily Express newspaper on 8 November 1920. Unlike most modern comic strips, Rupert Bear has always been produced in the original form of strip with illustrations accompanying text, called “text comics”, as opposed to text being incorporated into the art in speech bubbles etc. Bestall developed the classic Rupert story format: the story is told in picture form (generally two panels each day in the newspaper and four panels to a page in the annuals), in simple page-headers, in simple two-line-per-image verse and then as running prose at the foot.

(00:47:18) “Voyager” was a Sixth Doctor comic published in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 90-94, 1984). It introduced the character of Astrolabus and began the Voyager arc. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:51:40) “The World Shapers” was the final regular Doctor Who Magazine (issues 127-129, 1978) comic strip to feature the Sixth Doctor. It featured the death of Jamie McCrimmon, a fate which, as of 2020, has not been contradicted in any medium. It has also attracted attention because it was written by legendary comic scribe Grant Morrison. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:57:46) “Buster” was a British comic which began publication in 1960, originally published by IPC Magazines Ltd under the companies comic division Fleetway, then by Egmont UK Ltd under the same imprint until its closure in 2000. Despite missing issues due to industrial action during its run, the comic published 1,902 issues in total. The comic carried a mixture of humour and adventure strips, featuring the title character Buster and a host of other characters. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:58:20) “The Jocks & The Geordies” was a British comic strip which appeared in the magazine The Dandy and was drawn by Jimmy Hughes. It has run from 1975 to present. The strip was about two groups of five schoolboys living in the village of Crosspatch, crossing the border of Scotland and England. As a result, they were in constant battles with one another, with each in turn getting their comeuppance for pranks which were often quite violent. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(00:58:45) “Faceache” was a comic strip originally appearing in the British comic Jet, first appearing in issue 1, dated 1 May 1971. The strip was retained when Jet merged with Buster later that year. Drawn by Ken Reid, Ricky Rubberneck was a boy with a “bendable bonce” (head), his skin like stretch rubber. At will, he could scrunge his face into anything. The strip was retained when Jet merged with Buster later that year, the first merged issue dated 2 October 1971. The word scrunch had been slowly overtaken by scrunge. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(00:59:15) “Cheeky Weekly” was a British comic book magazine published every Monday by IPC Magazines Ltd. It ran for 117 issues from 1977 to February 1980. It merged with stable-mate Whoopee!, initially as a 16-page pull-out section. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(00:59:26) “Spike” was a British comics anthology that ran from 22 January 1983 to 28 April 1984. Published by D. C. Thomson, it was a traditional ‘action comic for boys’, with many of its strips revolving around football, athletics, school, war, sci-fi, espionage and mystery. After just 67 issues it merged with Champ comic in May 1984. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:07:00) “Endgame” was the first Eighth Doctor strip in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 244-247, 196). It reintroduced the character of Maxwell Edison, absent since the Fifth Doctor’s DWM run, and linked him to the Eighth Doctor’s new companion, Izzy Sinclair. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:12:25) “The Glorious Dead” was a Doctor Who Magazine comic story (issues 287-296, 2000) featuring the Eighth Doctor, Izzy Sinclair and Kroton. Published throughout 2000, it was an epic 10 parts long and featured the return to the comic strip of the Master who’d appeared in the previous year’s story The Fallen. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(01:25:45) “The Time of My Life” was a Doctor Who Magazine comic strip (issue 399, 2008) that featured the Tenth Doctor and Donna Noble. It was Donna’s final appearance in the DWM strip, taking place after the events of the Series 4 finale. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(01:26:25) “Wormwood” was the main comic story of 1998 in the pages of Doctor Who Magazine (issues 266-271, 1998). Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(01:28:49) “Gus Gorilla” was the cover star of the short lived humour comic Cor!! as well as the host of its editorial page. He later transferred over to Buster after the cancellation of Cor!!, and hosted a regular feature called ‘Gus’s Gags’. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:28:52) “Ivor Lott & Tony Broke” was a British strip which originally appeared in the comic book Cor!! on 6 June 1970, before moving to Buster when the two comics merged in June 1974. The comic strip was in syndication until the final issue of “Buster” on 3 January 2000. The comic was originally drawn by Reg Parlett and later continued by artists like Jim Crocker and Sid Burgon. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:32:54) “Tough Nutt & Softy Centre” ran in IPC’s Shiver and Shake title from 1973-74. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:37:01) “Tornado” was a short-lived weekly British comic magazine published for 22 issues by IPC Magazines between March 1979 and August 1979. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:37:15) “Robusters” is a British comic story that formed part of the original line-up of Starlord. Similar in premise to that of the Thunderbirds television series, it was created by writer Pat Mills and was drawn by Carlos Pino and Ian Kennedy initially, before Starlord’s merger with 2000 AD. After the merger, Dave Gibbons, Kevin O’Neill and Mike McMahon were regular artists on the series, along with occasional contributions from Mike Dorey.Along with Strontium Dog, Ro-Busters survived Starlord’s merger with 2000 AD, its sister comic at IPC Magazines Ltd. The series introduced the decommissioned war robot Hammerstein and the sewer robot Ro-Jaws, and gave rise to the popular ABC Warriors series. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:37:15) “Strontium Dog”is a long-running British comics series featuring in the British science fiction weekly 2000 AD, starring Johnny Alpha, a mutant bounty hunter with an array of imaginative gadgets and weapons. The series was created by writer John Wagner (under the pseudonym T. B. Grover) and artist Carlos Ezquerra for Starlord, a short-lived weekly science fiction comic, in 1978. When Starlord was cancelled, the series transferred to 2000 AD. In 1980, Wagner was joined by co-writer Alan Grant, although scripts were normally credited to Grant alone. Grant wrote the series solo from 1988 to 1990. After Ezquerra’s death in October 2018 the series was put in indefinite hiatus with no current plans for its continuation (other than some single-episode stories in special issues aimed at younger readers). Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:37:24) “Black Hawk” was a comic strip appearing on the British magazine Tornado, created by Gerry Finley-Day. It was one of three strips to transfer from Tornado to 2000 AD after the two merged. At the time of the Roman Empire a Nubian slave rises up against his captors and leads a rebellion. However his bravery is recognised by a Roman General and he is commissioned as a Roman Centurion. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:39:19) “The Cursed Earth” is the second extended storyline of the British science fictional comics character Judge Dredd. It appeared in 2000 AD, and it was the first Judge Dredd storyline to exceed twenty episodes. Written mostly by Pat Mills, the story arc added many core elements to the backstory of the world of Mega-City One, Judge Dredd’s city. The storyline ran from 2000 AD #61 to 85 (May to October 1978). Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.
(01:39:19) “The Day the Law Died” (progs 89–108). It’s 2101. The insane Judge Cal, head of the Special Judicial Squad (SJS), arranges the assassination of Chief Judge Goodman and then assumes the man’s position himself. By brainwashing Judges and employing alien mercenaries, Cal rules Mega-City One like a new version of Caligula. Dredd rallies together a few other Judges and Judge-Tutors to lead a resistance movement. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here. Frames and artwork related to this can be found on our Tumblr page here.

The Diddly Dum Podcast acknowledges the copyright of anyone we’ve pinched anything from.