Simon (for it is he) Brett returns to The Whoseum to engage the Diddly Dummers in chat about comic strips and comics – whether Doctor Who related or not. We end up spending so much time eulogising over our favourite strips that we have to do a part two next week. But before that, we celebrate a podcasting landmark.

 

MP3 Direct Link = DDPC136 – Comics & Strips (part 1)

 

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SHOWNOTES

(00:00:00) Our guest on this podcast is Simon Brett, formerly of the Blue Box Podcast and currently of the Strangers in Space Podcast. Simon can be found on Twitter here and on Facebook here and his writing and artwork can be found on his blog here.

(00:01:50) Simon’s first visit to The Whoseum took place in 2014 and can still be heard on our Podcast 17 which you can find here.

(00:04:41) The various artwork which Simon has done for Diddly Dum down the years can be seen on our Tumblr page here.

(00:09:01) The “breadcrumbs and butterbeans” line is of course a reference to the famous Mouse Mill episode of Bagpuss.

(00:17:17) Marvel’s Xcalibur comic “The Cross Time Caper” (comic strip frames can be found on our Tumbr page here).

(00:22:20) “The Iron Legion” was a Fourth Doctor comic strip published in Doctor Who Weekly (issues 01 – 08) in 1979. See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

(00:24:25) “The Star Beast” was a Fourth Doctor comic strip published in Doctor Who Weekly (issues 19 – 26) in 1980. See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

(00:29:30) “25 Glorious Years” was a Doctor Who reference book published by W. H. Allen in 1998. Photos of the autographs and the Lee Sullivan drawing which Mark found on the flyleaf when he bought it from a second hand bookshop can be seen on our Tumblr page here.

(00:33:09) “Junk-Yard Demon” was a Fourth Doctor comic strip released in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 58 – 59) in 1981. See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

(00:39:08) “From Hell” was a graphic novel by writer Alan Moore and artist Eddie Campbell, originally published in serial form from 1989 to 1998. The full collection was published in 1999 by Top Shelf Productions. Set during the Whitechapel murders of the late Victorian era, the novel speculates upon the identity and motives of Jack the Ripper. The novel depicts several true events surrounding the murders, although portions have been fictionalised, particularly the identity of the killer and the precise nature and circumstances of the murders.

(00:39:38) “Promethea” is a comic book series created by Alan Moore, J. H. Williams III and Mick Gray. It tells the story of Sophie Bangs, a college student from an alternate futuristic New York City in 1999, who embodies the powerful entity known as Promethea whose task it is to bring the Apocalypse.

(00:53:15) The changing socio-economic faces of Fudge Higgins – Thatcher’s Child to Blair Clone – can be found on our Tumble page here.

(00:54:215) “Tank Girl” is a British comic book created by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin. The eponymous character Tank Girl (Rebecca Buck – later revealed to have been born as Fonzie Rebecca Buckler) drives a tank, which is also her home. She undertakes a series of missions for a nebulous organization before making a serious mistake and being declared an outlaw for her sexual inclinations and her substance abuse. The comic centres on her misadventures with her boyfriend, Booga, a mutant kangaroo. The comic’s style is heavily influenced by punk visual art, and strips are frequently deeply disorganized, anarchic, absurdist, and psychedelic. The strip features various elements with origins in surrealist techniques, fanzines, collage, cut-up technique, stream of consciousness, and metafiction, with very little regard or interest for conventional plot or committed narrative. The strip was initially set in a futuristic Australia, although it drew heavily from contemporary British pop culture. A selection of frames can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:56:58) “Love and Rockets” (often abbreviated L&R) is a comic book series by the Hernandez brothers: Gilbert, Jaime, and Mario. It was one of the first comic books in the alternative comics movement of the 1980s. The Hernandez brothers produced stories in the series independently of each other. Gilbert and Jaime produced the majority of the material, and tended to focus on particular casts of characters and settings. Those of Gilbert usually focused on a cast of characters in the fictional Central American village of Palomar; the stories often featured magic realist elements. The Locas stories of Jaime centered on a social group in Los Angeles, particularly the Latin-American friends and sometime-lovers Maggie and Hopey. A selection of frames can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:57:22) Mark’s page of original John Hicklenton “Nemesis the Warlock” artwork can be seen on our Tumblr page here.

(01:01:40) “The Tides of Time” was the first Fifth Doctor comic story published in Doctor Who Monthly issues 61 – 67 (1982). See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

(01:05:05) “Stars Fell on Stockbridge” was a Fifth Doctor comic strip released in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 68 – 69) in 1982. See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

(01:09:30) “The Stockbridge Horror” was a Fifth Doctor comic strip released in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 70 – 75) in 1982-83. See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

(01:14:20) “Skywatch-7” was a comic story released in Doctor Who Magazine issue 58 and Winter Special in 1981. See some of the strips on our Tumblr page here.

The Diddly Dum Podcast acknowledges the copyright of anyone we’ve pinched anything from.