Sneaking through the “Aussie Podcasters” channel at Heathrow for their long-promised, long-delayed visit to the Whoseum this week are Rob and Mark from the “42 to Doomsday” podcast. Mark presents us with his back catalogue of “Doctor Who Bulletin” fanzines and Rob presents us with his copy of “The Doctor Who Technical Manual”.

Along the way, we compare the relative merits of Adelaide, Sydney and Perth, while mulling over Australian house prices and the role played by pink shorts in Australian democracy.

 

MP3 Direct Download Link = DDPC101 – 42 to Whomsday

 

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SHOWNOTES

(00:00:00) You’ll note that, in a fit of nostalgia promoted by the podcast 100 memoryfest, we’ve reverted to the original Diddly Dum Podcast theme music which opened our very first podcast. Put together by our own Al No and once described as “the Sisters of Mercy meets Delia Derbyshire”.

(00:01:18) The short story being read out by Doc here is “Roses” from DWM214, written by this week’s guest, Rob. See the shownote below at 01:08:56.

(00:01:57) Our guests this week are Rob and Mark of the “42 to Doomsday” podcast whose blog can be found here, and who can be found on Twitter here and on Facebook here.

(00:25:10) The day pink shorts helped to fight for democracy in Adelaide.

(00:41:45) Paul Cornell’s theory that the Third Doctor was an establishment figure appeared in “Doctor Who Bulletin” issue 112 in April 1993. A copy of the text of that article can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(00:57:12) “Doctor Who Bulletin” began life in the early 1980s as an amateur fanzine dedicated to Doctor Who.

(01:01:56) John Nathan Turner chomping on a copy of “Doctor Who Bulletin”.

(01:08:35) Embossing tape is a labeling medium usually of hard plastic. Embossing tape is used with embossing machines, often handheld. The company name and trademark “Dymo” is often associated with this sort of label.

(01:08:45) All the references to Doctor Who Magazine issue 214 (July 1994) arise from “Roses”, a short story which Rob had published on page 34 as part of DWM’s “Brief Encounters” series. A scan of the page can be found on our Tumblr page here. At this week’s podcast opens, Doc can be found reading out the start of this story this week just before Rob and Mark ring the doorbell.

(01:09:07) A scan of the “DWB Interview File” advertisement from DWM214 be found on our Tumblr page here.

(01:16:46) Travers & Wells”, written by Rob, was the third novel in the Lethbridge-Stewart line of hardcover novellas, released by Candy Jar Books in 2017.

(01:19:04) A scan of the “Fanzine Trap” feature from DWM214 can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(01:24:57) The Doctor Who Technical Manual” was a Doctor Who reference book published by in 1983 and written by Mark Harris. Scans of a few pages can be found on our Tumblr page here.

(01:29:52) The Doctor Who Pattern Book was an activity book published by W.H. Allen in 1987 and written by Mark Harris. The pictures used on Rob and Mark’s blog can be found here.

(01:31:08) “Doctor Who and the Daleks Omnibus”, edited by Daleks creator Terry Nation, was a British omnibus book published in 1976, especially for Marks and Spencer. It featured a collection of articles and photographs related to the Daleks as they had appeared in Doctor Who, as well as abridged and illustrated reprints of the novelisations of “Doctor Who and the Planet of the Daleks” and “Doctor Who and the Genesis of the Daleks” by Terrance Dicks. The anatomy of a Dalek cutaway can be seen on our Tumblr page here.

(01:34:04) Build the TARDIS” was an activity book published by Target Books and W. H. Allen.

The Diddly Dum Podcast acknowledges the copyright of anyone we’ve pinched anything from.

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