clipping 10This week’s visitor to the Diddly Dum Whoseum is Mark Cockram of the Blue Box Podcast and the Nerdology podcast. Mark becomes only the second guest to enter those hallowed portals for the third time.

Mark brings along The Special Edition DVD of “Inferno” and we celebrate the world of Doctor Who DVD extras. Hayden presents his prized collection of Anniversary Postage Stamps signed by Tom Baker and we hear about the day he met the great man. Doc’s exhibit is the page of the Radio Times covering Saturday 26 February 1972. On that evening, episode one of The “Sea Devils” was broadcast, the first story Doc can remember. We use this as an excuse to look at how BBC1 Saturday evening scheduling has changed down the years. Can you recognise some of the 70s and 80s theme tunes Doc plays before the boys guess them?

Finally, never one to miss relating a jammy experience, Hayden tells us about the day Tamsin Grieg asked if she could join him at his coffee shop table.

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SHOWNOTES

(00:01:05) Long time friend of the show and third time visitor to The Whoseum is The Human Palindrome himself, Mark Cockram, the second nicest man in podcasting – and even then he’s only narrowly pipped to the post by Doc. Mark is a regular (in the same way that Peter Jones was a “Just a Minute” regular) on The Blue Box Podcast and has his own Nerdology UK Podcast, famed for hosting the last ever appearance in this reality of the Classic Diddly Dum team.

(00:05:10) Hayden’s new project is Podcasters Royale, a podcast looking in turn at each 007 film together with guests. The podcast is hosted on the Diddly Dum iTunes account.

(00:58:10) A photo of Hayden approaching The Great Tom at The Stamp Centre can be found here on our Tumbler page.

(00:58:10) A photo of the stamps Tom signed for Hayden can be found here on our Tumbler page.

(01:11:25) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 26 Feb 1972 – the broadcast of episode 1 of “The Sea Devils”.

(01:12:00) “Here Come the Double Deckers” was a 17-part British children’s TV series from 1970-71, revolving around the adventures of seven children whose den was an old red double-decker London bus in an unused junk yard.

(01:14:20) “Grandstand” was a British television sport programme. Broadcast between 1958 and 2007, it was one of the BBC’s longest running sports shows.

(01:16:10) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 25 Jan 1975 – the broadcast of episode 1 of “The Arc in Space”.

(01:16:24) “The Flashing Blade” (Le Chevalier Tempête) is a French television serial made in the late 1960s. It was first broadcast in the UK on BBC children’s television during the 1960s, with several re-runs throughout the 1970s.

(01:17:20) “The Generation Game” is a British game show produced by the BBC in which four teams of two people from the same family, but different generations, competed to win prizes. It was one of the strongest shows in the BBC’s Saturday night line-up, and became the number-one game show on British television during the 1970s, regularly gaining over 21 million viewers.

(01:20:35) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 25 Oct 1975 – the broadcast of episode 1 of “The Pyramids of Mars”.

(01:20:40) “On The Move” was a television series made by the BBC and first broadcast in 1975 and 1976 in 50 ten-minute episodes. It was an educational programme aimed at adults with literacy problems, and linked to a national campaign at the time. It was credited with removing some of the stigma attached to illiteracy.

(01:24:40) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 30 Oct 1976 – the broadcast of episode 1 of “The Deadly Assassin”.

(01:24:45) “Multi-Coloured Swap Shop”, more commonly known simply as Swap Shop, was a British children’s entertainment programme that was broadcast every Saturday morning on BBC1 for 146 episodes in six series between 1976 and 1982. It was ground-breaking in many ways: by being live, sometimes up to three hours in length, and using the phone-in format extensively for the first time on TV.

(01:25:43) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 4 Mar 1978 – the broadcast of episode 5 of “The Invasion of Time”.

(01:21:35) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 28 Oct 1978 – the broadcast of episode 1 of “The Stones of Blood”.

(01:28:37) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 29 Sep 1979 – the broadcast of episode 1 of “The City of Death”.

(01:29:38) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 21 Mar 1981 – the broadcast of episode 4 of “Logopolis”.

(01:29:49) “The Pink Panther Show” is a showcase of cartoon shorts produced  between 1969 and 1979, starring the animated Pink Panther character from the opening credits of the live-action films.

(01:30:45) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 16 Mar 1984 – the broadcast of episode 4 of “The Caves of Androzani”.

(01:31:30) “Remington Steele” is an American television series co-created by Robert Butler and Michael Gleason. The series, starring Stephanie Zimbalist and Pierce Brosnan, was produced by MTM Enterprises and first broadcast on the NBC network from 1982 to 1987. The series blended the genres of romantic comedy, drama, and detective procedural. Remington Steele is best known for launching the career of Pierce Brosnan.

(01:32:00) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 6 Dec 1986 – the broadcast of episode 14 of “The Trial of a Time Lord“.

(01:33:53) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 6 Dec 1989 – the broadcast of episode 3 “Survival”.

(01:35:00) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 7 May 1996 – the broadcast of the TV Movie.

(01:36:35) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 26 Mar 2005 – the broadcast of “Rose”.

(01:38:18) Here is the Radio Time Genome page for BBC1 on 31 Mar 2007 – the broadcast of “Smith and Jones”.

The Diddly Dum Podcast acknowledges the copyright of anyone we’ve pinched stuff from.

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