10923794_10205753471700910_6523637478693478418_oThe Three Who Drool enter the New Year by inviting Andrew Smith into The Diddly Dum Whoseum. Originally famous as the teenage writer of Fourth Doctor story “Full Circle”, Andrew is once more writing Doctor Who and Blakes Seven plays for Big Finish.

The exhibits presented by Andrew to The Whoseum are the Radio Times Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary Special and Toby Hadoke’s “Who’s Round” podcast series. They provoke lots of chat.

Along the way, conversation turns inter alia to Police Box keys, how Norman Wisdom has informed The Rev’s image of the Police, dinosaurs at Crystal Palace and the UK’s first crematorium.

Please take the time to read about a charity Andrew is interested in, The Lily Foundation, which gives support to children and families facing the challenges of Mitochondrial Disease, and support them if you can. www.thelilyfoundation.org.uk              @4lilyfoundation

MP3 Download link = DDPC027 – Andrew Smith

Listen/download on iTunes

Audioboo

Stitcher.com

Find us on Facebook

We can also now be found on the Doctor Who Podcast Alliance

All artwork for the Diddly Dum Podcast by our own The Rev can be found collected here on Pinterest.

THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

The podcast ends with a tribute to our Whoseum guest in the form of a Blockbusters Gold Run. If you’d like to follow along with Al and The Rev as they attempt to go from Gold to Gold before the two of them lose interest, here’s a screenshot of the Gold Run screen.

ASQ

SHOWNOTES

Fresh from attending the vile debauch which was Toby Hadoke’s birthday bash, this week’s special guest at The Diddly Dum Whoseum is Andrew Smith, the man who in his late teens wrote the Fourth Doctor story “Full Circle” which introduced the companion Adric. Andrew then took up a career in the Police – the Diddly Dumbers like to imagine him as a cross between Jack Regan and Inspector Morse with a long scarf. In recent years and since his recent retirement from guarding us while we booze, new works which have come from Andrew’s pen include the Big Finish audio plays “The Invasion of E-Space” (Lalla Ward), “Domain of the Voord” (William Russell & Carole Ann Ford) and “The First Sontarans” (Sixth Doctor) and the to-be-released-this-January “Mistfall” (Fifth Doctor). Andrew has also written for Big Finish’s Blake’s Seven audio plays including “Retribution” (The Liberator Chronicles, Vol 10) and “Escape From Destiny” (The Liberator Chronicles, Vol 11). Also to be released this January is a BBC audiobook of “Full Circle” read by Matthew Waterhouse.

Please take the time to read about a charity Andrew is interested in, The Lily Foundation, which gives support to children and families facing the challenges of Mitochondrial Disease, and support them if you can. www.thelilyfoundation.org.uk              @4lilyfoundation

The first exhibit presented to The Whoseum by Andrew is The Radio Times Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary Special from 1973. Among the delights contained within this 68-page treasure were a new short story, “We are the Daleks!”, by Terry Nation, double-page spreads on each season, detailed plans for constructing a life-size Dalek and behind-the-scenes profiles. This 1973 Special famously inspired a 15 year old Peter Capaldi to write to Radio Times. Scans of many of the pages can be found here on the sfaction Tumbler page. A video clip of the pages can be found here on Youtube.

The Quarks were the robot servants of The Dominators in the Second Doctor story of that name.

Terry Nation was a Welsh television writer and novelist best known for creating the Daleks for Doctor Who. Nation was also the creator of two series, Survivors and Blake’s 7, in the 1970s.

The real Police Box on which the TARDIS is based has an interesting history. In 2002, The Metropolitan Police (London’s Police Force) unsuccessfully tried to sue the BBC for the trade mark rights to the design. The full case details can be found here. A map of the former locations of Police Boxes can be found here.

The Rev (and, to be fair, all decent and law abiding British citizens) gain our idea of how our Police Forces work entirely from films such as “Carry on Constable” (1960) and “The Belles of St Trinians” (1954) and “Norman on the Beat” (1962) and “Spare a Copper” (1942).

However, Doc’s formative experiences of the Police are derived from growing up in  a newsagent shop opposite his local police station and seeing policemen come into the shop to buy coloured crayons “to draw big maps so we can catch criminals”. A likely story, the infant Doc used to think cynically.

The Crystal Palace Dinosaurs, also known as Dinosaur Court, are a series of sculptures of extinct animals (including dinosaurs) in Crystal Palace Park. Commissioned in 1852 to accompany the Crystal Palace after its move from the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, they were the first dinosaur sculptures in the world. They were used as a backdrop for Carole Ann Ford’s photoshoot for The Radio Times Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary Special.

The Steepletone Blue Police Telephone Box.

The Rev’s Russian Doll of TARDISes.

Opened in 1901, the Hedon Road crematorium and chapel are thought to be the oldest municipal buildings in the country.

The second exhibit presented to The Whoseum by Andrew is Toby Hadoke’s “Who’s Round” series of podcasts. This series follows Toby’s quest to mark Doctor Whos’s 50th anniversary year by interviewing someone who had worked on every Doctor Who story. Notable interviews include Andrew “for it is he” Smith (#02), Waris Hussein (#06), Russell T Davies (#50 & #54 & #59 & #99), Uncle Terrance Dicks (#55), Richard Martin (#80), Lynda Belingham (#71 & #85), a Rev-pleasing Chris Jury (#86), Frazer Hines (#91), Mark Gatiss (#98) and Steven Moffat (#100).

XS Malarkey is a not-for-profit comedy club, hosted every week by Toby Hadokeand eagerly maintained by a group of minions who do his bidding on a regular basis.

Al and the Him travelled to Edinburgh in August 2012 to celebrate Al’s birthday seeing the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre and Toby Hadoke’s “My Stepson Stole My Sonic Screwdriver.”

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

Advertisements