DIDDLY DUM 028 – One or Twenty-Eight

The Diddly Dum Podcast returns after a break with some bombshell news. Then The Whoseum is opened up again to welcome Hayden Gribble and Matt Charlton who  have found the coveted copperplate invitations to The Whoseum in their Wonka Bars. Listen in as they present for exhibition items which speak to their hearts of what Doctor Who means.

Is that silver sphere a garden ornament or a Yeti control unit? What did Hayden find in his great grandmother’s Radio Times to set him off on a lifetime of Doctor Who fandom? How can Matt’s Ninth Doctor action figure be simultaneously groovy and bolshy? And where did Hayden get that shooting script from?

Along the way, the conversation leaps from Thals in ripped jeans to Pinky and Perky via the prospect of Doctor Who taking its soap opera elements to unheard of heights. Doc even reveals his guiltiest of secrets when it comes to TV viewing pleasure.

MP3 Download Link = DDPC028 – 001 or 028

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THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

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SHOWNOTES

Doc has been racking his brain trying to think who the caretakers left behind in the Whoseum remind him of. They sounded suspiciously like a pair of characters, Crun and Bannister, from The Goon Show. And their conversation bears a remarkable resemblance to The Goon Show’s “The Case of Vanishing Room”.

When you’ve seen a group of TV newsreaders singing and dancing once, every future year that they repeat it becomes less and less amusing. So it’s unfortunate for the BBC newsreaders that Morecambe and Wise beat them to it in 1977.

Pinky and Perky were a pair of puppet pigs created by Czechs Jan and Vlasta Dalibor. The characters of pigs were chosen because the pig is seen as a symbol of good luck in the former Czechoslovakia. They spoke and sang in high-pitched voice (Pink and Perky, that is,  not Jan and Vlasta) and often sang cover versions of popular songs.

“The White Horses” was a 1965 television series co-produced by RTV Ljubljana (now RTV Slovenija) of Yugoslavia and German TV (Südwestfunk). Its haunting theme tune/song is guaranteed to send a wistful shiver down the spine of anyone of a certain age (viz. Doc).

“The Singing Ringing Tree” was a children’s film made by East German studio DEFA in 1957 and shown in the form of a television series by the BBC.

“The Flashing Blade” was a French television serial made in the late 1960s. It was first broadcast in the UK on BBC children’s television during the 1960s, with several re-runs throughout the 1970s. The story is based upon historical events during the War of the Mantuan Succession (1628–1631) between France and Spain. The theme song is guaranteed to stir calls to duty in the breast of anyone of a certain age (viz. Doc).

“Follyfoot” was a children’s television series co-produced by Yorkshire Television and TV Munich. It aired in the UK between 1971 and 1973. The series starred Desmond Llewelyn (the original Q from James Bond) but he never told any of the characters “now listen carefully”.

Doctor Who designer Barry Newberry has sadly died at the age of 88.

“Doctor Who – The Troughton Years” was a video containing rare episodes from Patrick Troughton’s time as the Doctor.

Dominic Treadwell-Collins (born 26 August 1977) is a British television producer, known for his work on the soap operas Family Affairs and EastEnders and, if Matt gets his way, Doctor Who.

Roy Castle, OBE (31 August 1932 – 2 September 1994) was an English dancer, singer, comedian, actor, television presenter and musician. He played Ian in the Doctor Who and the Daleks film (1965) but even more famously hosted BBC children’s show “Record Breakers”. Footage of the breaking of the world tap dancing record at BBC Television Centre never fails to get the feet tapping in those of a certain age (viz. Doc).

The Radio Times 1996 “Return of The Time Lord” pull-out.

Born in Hull, Geoffrey Dummer MBE (25 February 1909 – 9 September 2002) was a British electronics engineer and consultant who is credited as being the first person to conceptualise and build a prototype of the integrated circuit, commonly called the microchip, in the late-1940s and early 1950s.

Dafydd ap Llywelyn (c. March 1212 – 25 February 1246) was Prince of Gwynedd from 1240 to 1246. He was the first ruler to claim the title Prince of Wales.

Timewyrm: Genesys

“Urgent Calls” by Big Finish

“Doctor Who: Thirty Years in the TARDIS” is a one-off, 50-minute television documentary, broadcast to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the show and originally transmitted on 29 November 1993. This was followed by a release on VHS, titled “More Than Thirty Years in the TARDIS”.

The Diddly Dum podcast acknowledges the copyright of anyone we’ve pinched anything from.

DIDDLY DUM 027 – Andrew Smith

10923794_10205753471700910_6523637478693478418_oThe Three Who Drool enter the New Year by inviting Andrew Smith into The Diddly Dum Whoseum. Originally famous as the teenage writer of Fourth Doctor story “Full Circle”, Andrew is once more writing Doctor Who and Blakes Seven plays for Big Finish.

The exhibits presented by Andrew to The Whoseum are the Radio Times Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary Special and Toby Hadoke’s “Who’s Round” podcast series. They provoke lots of chat.

Along the way, conversation turns inter alia to Police Box keys, how Norman Wisdom has informed The Rev’s image of the Police, dinosaurs at Crystal Palace and the UK’s first crematorium.

Please take the time to read about a charity Andrew is interested in, The Lily Foundation, which gives support to children and families facing the challenges of Mitochondrial Disease, and support them if you can. www.thelilyfoundation.org.uk              @4lilyfoundation

MP3 Download link = DDPC027 – Andrew Smith

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All artwork for the Diddly Dum Podcast by our own The Rev can be found collected here on Pinterest.

THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

The podcast ends with a tribute to our Whoseum guest in the form of a Blockbusters Gold Run. If you’d like to follow along with Al and The Rev as they attempt to go from Gold to Gold before the two of them lose interest, here’s a screenshot of the Gold Run screen.

ASQ

SHOWNOTES

Fresh from attending the vile debauch which was Toby Hadoke’s birthday bash, this week’s special guest at The Diddly Dum Whoseum is Andrew Smith, the man who in his late teens wrote the Fourth Doctor story “Full Circle” which introduced the companion Adric. Andrew then took up a career in the Police – the Diddly Dumbers like to imagine him as a cross between Jack Regan and Inspector Morse with a long scarf. In recent years and since his recent retirement from guarding us while we booze, new works which have come from Andrew’s pen include the Big Finish audio plays “The Invasion of E-Space” (Lalla Ward), “Domain of the Voord” (William Russell & Carole Ann Ford) and “The First Sontarans” (Sixth Doctor) and the to-be-released-this-January “Mistfall” (Fifth Doctor). Andrew has also written for Big Finish’s Blake’s Seven audio plays including “Retribution” (The Liberator Chronicles, Vol 10) and “Escape From Destiny” (The Liberator Chronicles, Vol 11). Also to be released this January is a BBC audiobook of “Full Circle” read by Matthew Waterhouse.

Please take the time to read about a charity Andrew is interested in, The Lily Foundation, which gives support to children and families facing the challenges of Mitochondrial Disease, and support them if you can. www.thelilyfoundation.org.uk              @4lilyfoundation

The first exhibit presented to The Whoseum by Andrew is The Radio Times Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary Special from 1973. Among the delights contained within this 68-page treasure were a new short story, “We are the Daleks!”, by Terry Nation, double-page spreads on each season, detailed plans for constructing a life-size Dalek and behind-the-scenes profiles. This 1973 Special famously inspired a 15 year old Peter Capaldi to write to Radio Times. Scans of many of the pages can be found here on the sfaction Tumbler page. A video clip of the pages can be found here on Youtube.

The Quarks were the robot servants of The Dominators in the Second Doctor story of that name.

Terry Nation was a Welsh television writer and novelist best known for creating the Daleks for Doctor Who. Nation was also the creator of two series, Survivors and Blake’s 7, in the 1970s.

The real Police Box on which the TARDIS is based has an interesting history. In 2002, The Metropolitan Police (London’s Police Force) unsuccessfully tried to sue the BBC for the trade mark rights to the design. The full case details can be found here. A map of the former locations of Police Boxes can be found here.

The Rev (and, to be fair, all decent and law abiding British citizens) gain our idea of how our Police Forces work entirely from films such as “Carry on Constable” (1960) and “The Belles of St Trinians” (1954) and “Norman on the Beat” (1962) and “Spare a Copper” (1942).

However, Doc’s formative experiences of the Police are derived from growing up in  a newsagent shop opposite his local police station and seeing policemen come into the shop to buy coloured crayons “to draw big maps so we can catch criminals”. A likely story, the infant Doc used to think cynically.

The Crystal Palace Dinosaurs, also known as Dinosaur Court, are a series of sculptures of extinct animals (including dinosaurs) in Crystal Palace Park. Commissioned in 1852 to accompany the Crystal Palace after its move from the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park, they were the first dinosaur sculptures in the world. They were used as a backdrop for Carole Ann Ford’s photoshoot for The Radio Times Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary Special.

The Steepletone Blue Police Telephone Box.

The Rev’s Russian Doll of TARDISes.

Opened in 1901, the Hedon Road crematorium and chapel are thought to be the oldest municipal buildings in the country.

The second exhibit presented to The Whoseum by Andrew is Toby Hadoke’s “Who’s Round” series of podcasts. This series follows Toby’s quest to mark Doctor Whos’s 50th anniversary year by interviewing someone who had worked on every Doctor Who story. Notable interviews include Andrew “for it is he” Smith (#02), Waris Hussein (#06), Russell T Davies (#50 & #54 & #59 & #99), Uncle Terrance Dicks (#55), Richard Martin (#80), Lynda Belingham (#71 & #85), a Rev-pleasing Chris Jury (#86), Frazer Hines (#91), Mark Gatiss (#98) and Steven Moffat (#100).

XS Malarkey is a not-for-profit comedy club, hosted every week by Toby Hadokeand eagerly maintained by a group of minions who do his bidding on a regular basis.

Al and the Him travelled to Edinburgh in August 2012 to celebrate Al’s birthday seeing the Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre and Toby Hadoke’s “My Stepson Stole My Sonic Screwdriver.”

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 026 – The Foot and Mouth Christmas Special

10620133_10205451278146260_4397356015913418024_oJoin The Three Who Drool at The Diddly Dum Whoseum for a festive podcast as, watched by an elite squad of firefighters, they light the first candle on their Advent Crown. If you listen very carefully, in the distance behind the giant Whoseum blast doors, you may just make out the faint notes of the Salvation Army band approaching up the snowy slopes of cruel Caradhras (which is played in a cameo appearance by Waltons Mountain).

This week, the Diddly Dumbers present exhibits of their own for display in The Whoseum. Each one is an item redolent for them of a part of their lives with Doctor Who – the podcasting community, Douglas Adams and The Golden Emperor himself.

MP3 Download link = DDPC026 – The Foot & Mouth Christmas Special

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Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

The podcast ends with a tribute to mark both Diddly Dum’s first year and Doc finally fixing the glitch in the software on the Blockbusters Gold Run screen. If you’d like to follow along with Al and The Rev as they attempt to go from Gold to Gold before the three of them lose interest, here’s a screenshot of the Gold Run screen.

xmas A

SHOWNOTES (and their time positions)

(00:05:45) Pocklington was the last place in England where a woman was burned for being a witch.

(00:05:25) Dylan Moran is an Irish comedian, writer, actor and filmmaker best known for his UK television sitcom Black Books.

(00:08:10) Fork Handles

(00:09:05) The Diddly Dum Advent Crown is, of course, inspired by the Blue Peter Advent Crown which those of us of a certain age remember as an inseparable part of the build-up to Christmas. Blue Peter‘s equivalent of the Fourth Doctor, Sarah and Harry – the Peter Purves, John Noakes and Valerie Singleton/Leslie Judd trio would build an advent crown every December from wire coat hangers, tinsel and candles.

(00:11:55) “Star Wars – The Force Awakens” as George Lucas would have made it – spoof trailer.

(00:12:25) Remember Me is a British supernatural TV drama starring Michael Palin.

(00:13:30) “Hammer Chillers” – audio drama to make you shiver.

(00:14:25) Doesn’t Legolas’ dad look magnificent astride…er….a big moose? Was this the moment that Peter Jackson jumped the shark?

(00:14:50) “The Germans” was the episode of Fawlty Towers where Basil is poleaxed by his moose head – surely the inspiration for the Elf King’s steed in the third of The Hobbit films.

(00:33:40) The Doctor Who Podcast Alliance hosts most Doctor Who related podcasts.

(00:35:55) Doc laid down his five laws for unsubscribing from a Doctor Who podcast in his own blog here.

(00:37:55) The Pharos Project Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:38:00) The Blue Box Podcast – their blog is here and their Facebook is here.

(00:38:10) Who Wars – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:38:10) 42 to Doomsday Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:38:15) The Bad Wilf Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:38:20) The Verity Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:38:20) Binro Was Right – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:38:25) The Tin Dog Podcast – their blog is here.

(00:38:30) Desert Island Who Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:39:40) Toby Hadoke’s Who’s Round – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:41:50) Raymond Patrick “Ray” Cusick (May 1928 – 21 February 2013) was a designer for the BBC. He is best known for designing the Daleks for Doctor Who.

(00:45:25) Radio Rassilon – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:46:20) Bigger on the Inside – their blog is here.

(00:46:45) Podshock – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:48:15) The new “Dad’s Army” filiming in Beverley.

(00:50:50) The Happiness Patrol – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:54:50)  The Zeuspod Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:55:40) Radio Free Skaro – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(00:56:40) Big Finish Podcast – their blog is here and their Twitter is here.

(01:00:30) Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. He wrote the Doctor Who television stories The Pirate Planet and Shada. He co-wrote City of Death with producer Graham Williams under the pseudonym David Agnew. He was also Doctor Who script editor for Season 17.  Douglas Adams had two brief appearances in the fourth series of Monty Python’s Flying Circus. At the beginning of episode 42, “The Light Entertainment War”, Adams is in a surgeon’s mask pulling on gloves (1 min 23 secs into this video clip). At the beginning of episode 44, “Mr. Neutron”, Adams is dressed in a pepper-pot outfit and loads a missile on to a cart driven by Terry Jones, who is calling for scrap metal (50 secs into this dubbed video clip). The two episodes were broadcast in November 1974. Adams and Chapman also attempted non-Python projects, including Out of the Trees. Here Douglas Adams pays tribute to Graham Chapman.

(01:07:55) “Don’t Panic: The Official Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Companion” is a book by Neil Gaiman about Douglas Adams and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. The book was originally published in January 1988 in the United States and United Kingdom.

(01:08:30) “Ghastly Beyond Belief” by Neil Gaiman and Kim Neman collects the most jaw-droppingly bad quotes from a half century of sf stories, books and films.

(01:09:09) “Duran Duran – The First Four Years” by Neil Gaiman.

(01:19:00) “Hyperland” is a 50-minute long documentary film about hypertext and surrounding technologies. It was written by Douglas Adams and produced and directed by Max Whitby for BBC Two in 1990. It stars Douglas Adams as a computer user and Tom Baker, with whom Adams had already worked on Doctor Who, as a personification of a software agent.

(01:22:30) Vic Reeves interviews detective / antique expert John Lovejoy.

(01:23:15) Toast of London is a British comedy series following Steven Toast (played by former The IT Crowd and Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace actor Matt Berry), an eccentric middle-aged actor with a chequered past who spends more time dealing with his problems off stage than performing on it. Two series have currently been broadcast, in 2013 and 2014.

Guy Martin (born 4 November 1981 in Grimsby, Lincolnshire, England) is a British motorcycle racer, lorry mechanic and occasional TV presenter.

(01:26:15) The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is a comedy science fiction series created by Douglas Adams. Originally a radio comedy broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 1978, it later became was later adapted to other formats including a 1981 TV series, a 1984 computer game, and a feature film. Doc and The Rev also indulged in the vinyl LP versions of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Restaurant at the End of the Universe which had lovely cool music added.

(01:34:55) The Golden Emperor Dalek was the anti-hero of 1960 weekly magazine, TV Century 21 – Issue One of which can be found here. Every page of this strip (which has come to be known as The Dalek Chronicles) can be found on this Flickr page. This strip is also covered in one of the “Stripped for Action” DVD extras. The strip was briefly revived in Doctor Who Magazine (issues 249 – 254). The unpublished artwork for the final story can be found here and will form the basis for the completed story to be published, Gareth Kavanagh tentatively assures the world, in Vworp Vworp! Magazine #3 in 2015 – links to which are here being sprayed left and right and centre. The artwork will be by Lee Sullivan whose website can be found here.

(01:53:30) This December Titan Comics is teaming up with The WHO Shop to celebrate the store​’​s 30th Birthday with a special Doctor Who Comics Christmas triptych cover variant! These variants will only be available to purchase at The W​HO​ Shop. This special image featuring​ the Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Doctors was created by artist Lee Sullivan (Doctor Who Magazine, Transformers, Thundercats, 2000AD) and ​runs across three ​Doctor Who comic issues this December​: ​Tenth Doctor #5, Eleventh Doctor #5 and Twelfth Doctor #3​. (Thanks to the Kasterborous website for the link and the text – their splendid podcast should have been included in our list above – but we couldn’t remember everyone).

(01:57:55) The Gold Run was the climactic experience of each round of Blockbusters.

Monty Python’s mysterious office in Beverley.

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 025 – Whoniversary

Happy Doctor Who Day to one and all. To celebrate The Glorious 23rd, The Three Who Drool have invited into the marble halls of the Diddly Dum Whoseum the man who first suggested that they do a podcast together – J R Southall of the Blue Box Podcast (for it is he).

The spiritual absent father of the Diddly Dum Podcast presents the following to the Whoseum as significant milestones in his Doctor Who life: “The Doctor Who Monster Book” (1975), his complete collection of both sets of both Doctor Who Weetabix cards (not in the original packaging alas) and “You and Who” – the collection of Doctor Who essays compiled by JR himself. Listen in as the four Fine Doubters (and dogs) discuss the Whoseum’s new exhibits before the thrilling climax when JR wheels in his final exhibit and installs Steven Moffat permanently in the cryogenic display case.

Along the way, the podcasters discuss the role played by Cairn Terriers in their Doctor Who lives, whether phoenixes and unicorns count as real creatures, the struggle involved in writing to order, the significance of the capital letter Y in moral philosophy and whether it is obligatory to hate Doctor Who.

And of course it wouldn’t be a Whoseum podcast without JR putting himself on the hot spot for a Blockbusters Gold Run. What grand prize awaits him if he manages to go from gold to gold in 360 seconds or less?

Direct Download Link: DDPC025 – Whoniversary

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THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

SHOWNOTES

The night Sid James died at The Sunderland Empire.

The Doctor Who Monster Book and, on some of its interior pages, The Zarbi and The Silurians and The Zygons and The Cybermen.

We can find little information about The Rev’s “Sci-fi Now” book except that it was written by Alan Frank and published in 1976. Buy it if you’re interested.

In 1975 Weetabix ran its first Doctor Who promotion in the UK. The famously yellow packets of the breakfast cereal contained collectible stand-up card characters. The inside of the cereal packet was printed with a variety of background diorama scenes in which to place the cards. In 1977 Weetabix ran another Doctor Who promotion where the card characters were game pieces in a variety of board games which were again printed on the inside of the cereal packet. Our very own Doc (for it is he) has also discussed these Weetabix promotions in his own blog.

“You and Who” is a book of Doctor Who fan reminiscences, edited by J.R. Southall, which was published in 2012. The following year the two-volume set “Contact Has Been Made” was released, in which fans discussed their memories of and connections with specific stories. Both are currently out of print, but that situation should be rectified soon…

“Out of the Unknown” is a British television science fiction anthology drama series, produced by the BBC and broadcast on BBC2 in four series between 1965 and 1971. 

Al insists that he likes Doc’s personal blog which can be found here. Al’s personal blog can be found here and The Rev’s can be found here.

This article says a lot of what Doc never got around to saying about the capital letter Y in old bibles.

“Nutty” was a British comic that ran for 292 issues from 16 February 1980 to 14 September 1985, when it merged with The Dandy.

The Gold Run was the climactic experience of each round of Blockbusters.

“Paddy McGinty’s Goat” was a strip about an alien which took the form of a goat . It appeared in “Jet”, a shortlived weekly British comic published by IPC in 1971 which lasted for 22 issues before merging into Buster.

Doc explains that the old Time Lord ceremonial collars of “Deadly Assassin” days looked far cooler than those in “Day of the Doctor” which resemble a Curly-Wurly.

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 024 – Doc in Heaven

For this double review of “Dark Water” and “Death in Heaven”, the Diddly Dumbers pay tribute to the theory developed by The Him (Al’s éminence grise) that Steven Moffat’s source material for Doctor Who is stolen entirely from Danger Mouse episodes. So they leap once again into the Molecular Nanoscaler and shrink themselves small enough to enter the secret agent’s pillar box base.

Nestled safely among the uncollected post, the Diddly Dumbers start with Doc’s mammoth rambling review of his recent trip to the British Film Institute to see the premiere of “Future Shock – The Story of 2000AD”. Eventually, the Three Who Drool remember that this is primarily a Doctor Who related podcast and turn to the Series 8 finale double-bill.

Along the way, The Rev reveals how Steven Moffat is cooking pasta with guess who’s spice rack, Doc gets so deeply mired in an elaborate “Friends” analogy that he forgets why he started it, Al hams it up with hamartia, we cover how “The Happiness Patrol” never came near 2000AD’s “Invasion” in attacking Margaret Thatcher, why it’s illegal to produce horror comics in the UK, Australia’s joint-second top contributions to world culture, how watching Steven Moffat’s finale was like those scouts on a roller-coaster in “J**’** F** I*”, and we discover why the campest character in sci-fi history could well have been Admiral Ackbar.

Direct Download Link: DDPC024 – Doc in Heaven

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All artwork for the Diddly Dum Podcast by our own The Rev can be found collected here on Pinterest.

THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

SHOW NOTES

Humber Comic-Con

Through the generosity of friend of the show Kevin Jordan, on 28 October 2014, Doc stayed late at work (a genuine first!) in order to spend the evening at the nearby British Film Institute where, as part of their “Sci-fi Days of Fear and Wonder” season, they were showing the premiere of “Future Shock – The Story of 2000AD”. This was a 105mins docu-film telling (believe it or not) the story of British comic 2000AD. The evening was rounded off with a Q&A session including Pat Mills and Kevin O’Neill. Photos of the audience at the event can be found on the producer’s blog. You won’t be able to spot Doc because he left his box at home that night.

Here you can find a page of 2000AD artwork specially drawn as a dig at working conditions on the comic which was banned from publication by the soulless minions of orthodoxy.

One morning in early 1977, Doc’s weekly comic dropped through the letter-box of his family home. It may have been “Whizzer & Chips” or “The Beezer” or “Cor!” (Doc forgets) but it was to change this mild-mannered 10-year old into the giant of podcasting that you see today. For the centrespread consisted of a four-page advert for the brand new comic 2000AD (on pale pink paper). Thanks to Gary at “Tainted Archive” for preserving a copy online. Was Doc attracted by the promise of anarchic anti-hero adventure or by the free Space Spinner frisbee? We will never know.

The Heavy Metal Kids as a visual literacy aid.

“Robot Wars” is often accepted as the story which propelled Judge Dredd to No 1 strip in 2000AD.

Here is the offending picture wherein the bridge looked far too much like a penis for the tastes of the 2000AD censors.

The docu-film provides more evidence to support Al’s assertion that Hardware (1990) – Richard Stanley’s once-rare cult classic - ripped off the design of Walter’s Robo-Tale – “SHOK!” from the Judge Dredd Annual 1981 as discussed in Diddly Dum Podcast #021.

Early 2000AD strip “Invasion” contained a scene which was supposed to suggest the shooting of Margaret Thatcher. Eat your heart out, “The Happiness Patrol”.

“Strip” comic from The Rev’s youth.

Outlaw infant “Baby-Face Finlayson” is a fictional character in a comic strip in the UK comic “The Beano”.

Leo Baxendale (born 27 October 1930 is a British cartoonist and the creator of The Bash Street Kids.

Fortean Times is a British monthly magazine devoted to the anomalous phenomena popularised by Charles Fort.

It’s forbidden to produce horror comics in the UK.

“Thrill-Power Overload: Thirty Years of 2000AD” by David Bishop

“Judge Dredd – the Mega-History” by Colin M Jarman

Pat Mills and Dave Gibbons contributed to Doctor Who Weekly/Monthly with such stories as “The Song of the Space Whale” and “Star Beast” and “Iron Legion“.

Rob Irwin’s “Who Wars Podcast” is the podcast for those among us who just can’t decide between Star Wars and Doctor Who. Episodes #09, #10 and #12 of Rob’s podcast include a three-part interview with EricJ, also known as Eric J or Eric Johnson, who is a comic book artist and the co-creator of “Rex Mundi”, an American comic book series featuring a quest for the Holy Grail told as a murder mystery set in the year 1933, in an alternate history Europe where magic is real.

The Starburst Bookworm Podcast Season 2 Episode 25 interviews The Art Heroes, Lee Robinson and Dan Clifford.

Joint second (behind Holly Valance) in the list of Australia’s greatest contributions to world culture is Rob and Mark’s splendid 42 to Doomsday Podcast.

Louis the Stammerer

Laurence Stephen “L.S.” Lowry (1 November 1887 – 23 February 1976) was an English artist born in Lancashire.

Jim Steinman

In long-gone TV show “Jim’ll Fix It” which we now have to pretend, like Gary Glitter’s songs, never existed, a 1980 TV memory indelibly etched on UK memories is the group of boy scouts who wanted to eat their lunch on a roller-coaster.

“Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday” was a stage play which ran at the Adelphi Theatre in London in 1974.

The more gullible among you may have fallen for the   that Missy’s true identity is The Master. The Diddly Dumbers, however, remain convinced that their original theory of her being Mrs McClusky from Grange Hill still holds water.

“Mind Reader – An Evening of Wonders” is the name of Derren Brown’s third live stage show which had its first run of 42 dates in 2007. The introduction to the show was a video including gorillas playing table tennis to demonstrate change blindness. Brown then appeared and indicated that a some point during the show “a man in a gorilla suit will come onto stage and steal a banana”. The challenge for the audience was to notice the banana being stolen. The banana was then successfully removed while the audience attention was directed elsewhere. Later in the show, when the gorilla came on stage more obviously, it was revealed that it was Derren in the costume.

“Doctor Who: Thirty Years in the TARDIS” is a one-off, 50-minute television documentary, broadcast to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the science-fiction series Doctor Who. It was originally transmitted on Monday 29 November 1993. This was followed by a release on VHS, titled “More Than… Thirty Years in the TARDIS”.

Admiral Ackbar totally camps it up in “Return of the Jedi”.

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 023 – Nightline

For this double review of “Flatline” and “In the Forest of the Night”, the Diddly Dumbers have repaired to a sylvan glade. But the peaceful location belies a lurking menace. Which of us hasn’t shivered at the idea of growling in the bushes?

Each new podcast seems to reveal another shocking example of shameless thievery on Steven Moffat’s part. You know that “how can I have been so blind?” feeling when the penny drops and something is laid bare which has been staring you in the face for years? That’s how our podcasters felt this week when The Him (Al’s eminence grise) pointed out what now seems so obvious – that the idea behind every Series 8 episode of Doctor Who can be traced back to an original episode of “Danger Mouse”. The Three Who Drool discuss this outrage.

Along the way, we cover the role of the Three Day Week in The Rev’s conception, Doc having to wait over 40-odd years for his scariest ever experience in Doctor Who, ten foots and snickleways, The Rev finding that the day can be as scary as the night, has normally lovely Sigourney Weaver ever been a more of a total bitch than her character in “Working Girl”, comics as a form of literacy, Al finding Judge Dredd standing next to him at the urinal, the best way not to be killed by tigers and “Peppa Pig” as a prequel to “Animal Farm”.

As an erotic climax, Al finally explains his theory of Doctor Who as Greek tragedy.

Direct Download Link: DDPC023 – Nightline

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SHOW NOTES

We mourn the passing of the sublimely lovely Linda Bellingham. From “The Sweeney” to “All Creatures Great and Small” and reaching her apogee as the Inquisitor throughout the run of “Trial of a Time Lord” before going on to show Peggy Mitchell how to be a proper gangsteress in “The Bill”. In her later career, she became stereotyped as a strong and versatile actress but it’s her work in the field of Oxo which is how we like to remember her.

The Rev pays tribute to the divine Lynda on his own blog.

Big Finish “Tom Baker at 80″ CD

The BBC’s Genome project gives all Radio Times listings. Find out what was being broadcast on your birthday.

“Diana” is an American sitcom that aired on NBC during the 1973-1974 television season that was created by Leonard Stern and starred Diana Rigg in her first American television series.

Leonard Sachs, as compere of “The Good Old Days” was surely the inspiration for Henry Gordon Jago.

The power cuts of the 1970s were his parents’ inspiration for The Rev himself.

Captain Mainwaring plays the bagpipes 27 mins into the “If The Cap Fits” episode of Dad’s Army.

Al has written a column in print issue #406 of Starburst magazine.

Thomas Love Peacock

Lotte Lenya played Colonel Rosa Klebb who got frisky with Daniela Bianchi in “From Russia With Love”

The birth of the BBC

Charles David George “Charlie” Stross (born 18 October 1964) is a British writer of science fiction, Lovecraftian horror and fantasy.

A Spirograph is a geometric drawing toy that produces mathematical roulette curves. It was developed by British engineer Denys Fisher and first sold in 1965.

The form of pantograph which Doc was struggling to name was, of course, the Sketch-a-Graph.

Rising Damp is a British sitcom produced by Yorkshire Television for ITV and originally broadcast from 1974 through 1978. Starring inter alia Leonard Rossiter and Frances de la Tour.

The 2d-to-3D effects in “Flatline” remind The Rev of the stained-glass knight in the “Young Sherlock Holmes” film (1985).

Not to be outdone by a Yorkshireman in the cultural hinterland stakes, the TARDIS in Clara’s handbag reminds Lancastrian Doc of the carpet bag scene in “Mary Poppins”.

“Saving Mr. Banks” is a 2013 American-Australian-British historical drama film centered on the development of the 1964 Walt Disney Studios film “Mary Poppins”.

Doc’s slightly obscure demand that Cagney and Lacey get that washroom redecorated comes from 4 mins 50 seconds into this Victoria Wood performance.

Brian Sibley is a British writer and broadcaster who wrote the 26 episode radio adaptation of “Lord of the Rings” first broadcast on BBC Radio Four in 1981 and which starred Ian Holm as Frodo, later to play Bilbo in Peter Jackson’s film trilogy.

“The Land of Narnia” by Brian Sibley

Christopher Fairbank who played annoying foreman Fenton in “Flatline” is perhaps known best (certainly to The Rev) for his role as Moxey in “Auf Wiedersehen Pet”.

“Nocturnal Activities” by John Williams from “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom”.

Aussie Rob@WhoWars, who delights in the Diddly Dumbers having three distinct accents, has his own Doctor Who/Star Wars crossover podcast which is a must.

A view from the cab of a Diesel train travelling the full length of the line from Withernsea to Hull, filmed by Stan Kerman in 1957.

Disused stations – Hedon Station.

Ten Foots and Snickleways

Ramsey Campbell’s “Demons by Daylight”

A113 (sometimes A-113 or A1-13) is an inside joke, an Easter egg in animated films created by alumni of California Institute of the Arts.

Alan-Moore-the-wonderful-wizard-of…Northampton. “Heaven” is the last track on Alan Moore & Tim Perkins “Angel Passage” CD.

“Swamp Thing” issue #32

“Swamp Thing” issue #53 – “The Garden of Earthly Delights”

“Pog” and “Abandoned House”: Alan’s Moor’s “Swamp Thing” issues #32 and #33.

Rev’s short film looking at the development of Gothic as a design style from it’s early beginings as an architectural style to it’s use as a fashion style. Ideal for Art & Design Education. And that voiceover sounds strangely familiar.

“Theatre of Blood” is a 1973 horror film starring Vincent Price as vengeful actor Edward Lionheart (and Diana Rigg as his daughter Edwina). Among other Shakeapearian deaths, Lionheart punishes theatre critic, Robert Morley, by cooking his pet poodles a la Titus Andronicus. Vincent Price also used to ask people to pass the mustard.

“The Abominable Dr Phibes” is a 1971 British horror film starring Vincent Price who is inspired in his murderous spree by the Ten Plagues of Egypt from the Old Testament. It was followed by “Dr Phibes Rises Again”.

Dave Gibbons is appointed the UK’s first comics laureate.

Comics Literacy Awareness (CLAw) is an exciting new literacy charity formed by a group of passionate and highly experienced trustees from the fields of education and comics. The mission of CLAw is to dramatically improve the literacy levels of UK children through the medium of comics and graphic novels. CLAw will also aim to raise the profile, image and respectability of comics and graphic novels as both a valid art form and as works of literature.

Neil Cameron’s blog entry on comics and literacy.

Judge Minty – a not for profit fan film.

The Phoenix Comic contains Adam Murphy’s “Corpse Talk: Digging up history one hero at a time”.

“Here Come the Double Deckers” was a 17-part British children’s TV series from 1970-71 revolving around the adventures of seven children whose den was an old red double-decker London bus in an unused junk yard. Scooper, the leader of the group, was played by a young Peter Firth who would go on to play Harry Pearce in the BBC One show “Spooks“.

WALL-E

The Diddly Dum Podcast would like at this point to declare an interest. We hold no interests in Ted Baker. However, since Friend of the Show Tariq has suggested that Doc’s visit to the HQ might have been explained by his being on acid at the time, we would like to provide evidence that their front door is indeed in the middle of a giant lobster, visitors to their Reception are indeed greeted by a barking animatronic Golden Retriever, and their lifts are indeed just like Roald Dahl’s Great Glass Elevator in having fun buttons all over their walls.

The Rev’s favourite bit of silence ever is the 8 seconds between the end of the 20th Century Fox fanfare and the start of the Star Wars fanfare.

“Danger Mouse” is a British children’s animated television series which was produced by Cosgrove Hall Films for Thames Television. It features the eponymous Danger Mouse, an English mouse who works as a secret agent. It is also clearly the inspiration for Series 8 of Doctor Who. Take a look at episode 5 of “Day of the Suds” where Nelson’s Column has been toppled. In “Time Slip”, Danger Mouse goes back in time to meet Robin Hood. Are you listening, Mr Gatiss? And do we need to say any more about “Danger Mouse on the Orient Express“?

“Doctor Who and the Song of Goats” – Al’s Greek tragedy theory from his own blog.

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 022 – Express Delivery

For this double review of “Kill the Moon” and “Mummy on the Orient Express”, the Diddly Dumbers have bought Third Class tickets and donned dinner jacket T-shirts to sneak into the First Class dining car. Will they manage to complete the whole podcast before anyone checks their tickets?

10708495_10205096282791598_5430766889711835568_oAlong the way: The Three Who Drool are christened “the 1970s sitcom of Doctor Who podcasting” by a rival podcast. We reminisce about our past encounters with Sylvester McCoy. We discover that famous people are sometimes more lovely than you think. A slow printer replaces the water-cooler as the office gathering place. We reveal the original source from which Peter Harness shamelessly stole the “dragon living in a moon” plot. Al unfolds his insane theory about Perkins’ secret identity. We discover the film against which The Rev measures all other films. We touch briefly on working class situations in British porn. We decide which soap Doctor Who ought to resemble, and Doc away explains his body (10% human, 90% cardboard) by revealing his true comic book identity. Even Strontium Dog and his sidekicks Wulf and the Gronk get a mention.

Direct Download Link: DDPC022 – Express Delivery

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SHOW NOTES

The Rev really revels in Hornby train sets. It’s choo choo choo all the way to Hull.

Newest and cruelest (sob) friends of Diddly Dum are the denizens of the “Binro Was Right Podcast”. Their eponymous hero is, of course, Binro the Heretic, a character from Key to Time season story “The Ribos Operation” who was persecuted for his beliefs. Their caricature of the Diddly Dumbers as the 1970s sitcom of Doctor Who podcasting, painting Doc and Al as a “Terry and June” couple and The Rev presumably as the child they never had, is uncomfortably near the mark.

Matt Smith demonstrates why we should avoid using cloud technology. He’s not joking, he’s deadly cirrus.

Among the DVD extras for “The Second Coming” is an outtake where Ninth Doctor Christopher Eccleston surprises a co-star by appearing at a bathroom door clad in nothing but a sock over his manhood.

“Exploration Earth”, an audio story featuring Tom Baker and Elisabeth Sladen.

The Amazing Criswell

During the 2007 Hull Comedy Festival, our very own Rev (and his pal Sean) wins a BBC competition and had some of their little Spacehopper fims shown late at night on BBC2 as part of “The British Summer of Film”.

Macmillan Cancer Support Coffee Morning

The late actor Geoffrey Hughes played Twiggy in “The Royle Family” but far more famously also played workshy binman, Eddie Yeats, in Coronation Street – sidekick to Stan and Hilda Ogden. And if you fast forward to 2 mins 15 secs into this Youtube clip, you’ll find the famous Stan and Hilda kiss which The Rev refers to.

“Expresso” – Norman Wisdom’s last film.

“Melancholia” is a 2011 Danish art film written and directed by Lars von Trier.

The Diddly Dum Podcast rocks the foundations of Doctor Who writing this week by revealing that the space creature so improbably hatching from The Moon was based on The Soup Dragon from Oliver Postgate masterpiece “The Clangers”.

Peter Harness hails from Hornsea, home of the famous Hornsea Pottery and inspiration for The Rev’s photography book on Hornsea.

“Is Anybody There?” is a 2008 British drama film starring Michael Caine.

“Come Live With Me” song from Richard III (1995).

Doc stamps his authority on his chums as the Daddy Bear of the podcast by finally remembering some kids TV which predates Al and The Rev. Casey Jones (with Casey Junior) was, of course, the famous driver of The Cannonball Express.

“Horror Express” is a 1972 Spanish/British horror film directed by Eugenio Martín and starring Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing.

The Mary Rose raised from The Solent in 1982.

“Bergerac” was a British television show set in Jersey starring John Nettles as the title character Detective Sergeant Jim Bergerac and of course Louise (Leela) Jameson.

The Desert Island Who Podcast.

“Time Travel for the Discerning Rock Fan” – The Rev uses his own blog to rhapsodise about Queen.

Al muses at length about “Kill the Moon” and “Three-Fold Musing” and “Mummy on the Orient Express” on his own blog.

Doc hasn’t put much on his own blog for a few weeks but he’s damned if he isn’t going to get a look-in too if The Rev and Al are going to plug theirs.

“Strontium Dog” is a long-running comics series featuring in the British science fiction weekly 2000 AD, starring Johnny Alpha, a mutant bounty hunter with an array of imaginative gadgets and weapons.

“Ro-Busters” is a British comic story that formed part of the original line-up of Starlord. Similar in premise to that of the Thunderbirds television series, it was created by writer Pat Mills and was drawn by Carlos Pino and Ian Kennedy initially, before Starlord’s merger with 2000 AD. Ro-Busters is a commercial rescue organisation run by Howard Quartz, known as “Mr. 10 Per Cent” because 90% of him is robotic. Thus he has been compared to our own Doc Whom because 90% of him is cardboard.

The BBC’s official Doctor Who website gallery sends The Rev into ecstasies of design delight.

“Three Fold Musing” – more ravings from the padded cell that is Al’s blog.

Doctor Who – “Death Comes to Time”.

Trebor Mummies and their Tales from the Tomb.

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 021 – Taking the Heist

This double review of “Time Heist” and “The Caretaker” opens with the Diddly Dumbers being pursued through the vaults of the Karabraxos Bank by fiendish monsters from their childhood nightmares. At the last minute, our heroes manage to escape by Transmat and land in the empty staff room of Coal Hill School.

heist 800Along the way, the Three Who Drool discuss the late Dr Evelyn Smythe and identify why the design of the Skovox Blitzer reminded them of Christmas morning 1980. They debate why different vocal stresses are given to street and road names and explore Steven Moffat’s push to reboot the new Doctor as the Peter Cushing incarnation.

Direct Download Link: DDPC021 – Taking the Heist

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All artwork for the Diddly Dum Podcast by our own The Rev can be found collected here on Pinterest.

THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

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SHOW NOTES

The Rev depicts the last minute escape of the Diddly Dumbers from the bank vaults as the podcast begins. For those of you unfamiliar with UK TV banking commercials from the 1980s, the yellow Griffin was used to advertise Midland Bank (now swallowed up by HSBC) and the pig was used to advertise Nat West Bank.

Dr Evelyn Smythe is a fictional character played by Maggie Stables in a series of audio plays produced by Big Finish Productions based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. A professor of history from the 20th century with a fondness for chocolate, she is a companion of the Sixth Doctor.

The Rev goes to see Al Murray, The Pub Landlord.

Brian Blessed – “Man Alive! What’s wrong with big tomatoes?”

Man Alive!

Katy Manning with Peter Capaldi in the TARDIS

Zam Wessell was a shapeshifting bounty hunter in “Attack of the Clones”.

Peter Capaldi as the Magician Doctor

The Doctor’s Leaning Tower of Pisa joke was as good as any of the “Police Squad” epilogues.

The origin of Finkle Street

“The Lodger” comic strip by Gareth Roberts – (Doctor Who Magazine #368)

Hardware (1990) – Richard Stanley’s once-rare cult classic.

Walter’s Robo-Tale – “SHOK!” from the Judge Dredd Annual 1981

Gladstone Primary School, Cardiff

Cathays Library, Cardiff

Cathays Cemetery, Cardiff

Peter Capaldi appears on The Graham Norton Show (26 Sept 2014)

Alvin Stardust – “you must be out of your tiny minds” – Green Cross Code TV ad.

Little Kiran – Kiran Shah was the actor who played whatever was under the bedspread in “Listen”.

Pink Floyd – Another Brick in the Wall, Part Two

“Poetics” by Aristotle

Coal Hill School’s motto – “A Spirit of Adventure”

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 020 – Oi, Robot

For their double review of “Robot of Sherwood” and “Listen”, the Diddly Dumbers travel to Sherwood Forest itself to record the podcast.

Along the way, the Three Who Drool discuss the best incarnations of Robin Hood down the years on the big and small screen, a new form of chocolate scampi with mysterious centres and hanky panky with Arthur Lowe. They analyse the evidence linking Terrance Dicks to Star Wars’ Admiral Ackbar and debate the sexual propriety of the TARDIS console now incorporating moist, squelchy slits.

Just below the embedded media player, you’ll find that we’ve finally included the facility to download the MP3 directly from the blog. This has been added to all previous podcasts too.

Direct Download Link: DDPC020 – Oi, Robot

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All artwork for the Diddly Dum Podcast by our own The Rev can be found collected here on Pinterest.

THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

SHOW NOTES

No Complications: Robot of Sherwood (time shift) – on Al’s blog.

No Complications: Listen (time shift) – on Al’s blog.

Iain Martin’s blog

The supernatural attack on the podcasters which sent Doc running back to The Cloven Hoof forms the closing minutes of Diddly Dum Podcast 010 (Date With the Devil) from about 1 hr 50 mins onwards.

Angus Lennie

Pip and Jane Baker

Spaceballs

The Unforgettable Yootha Joyce

Robin of Sherwood

Clannad’s Robin of Sherwood theme music

The Scarifyers by Bafflegab Productions

Some of The Rev’s historical illustrations from his film about Conisbrough Castle.

Monty Python’s Knights Who Say Ni

Richard Carpenter – Interviews in Sherwood

Rocket Robin Hood was a Canadian animated TV series.

Battenberg cake

“The Phony King of England” was a song from the Disney animated Robin Hood (1973)

Tom Baker hosts “Disney Time” in 1975

Robin Hood (John Cleese) in Time Bandits

“Today there is no news”, BBC 18 April 1930

Celebrations chocolate box

Cadbury’s Criss Cross TV advert

Arthur Lowe advertises Hanky Panky

Pyramint TV advert

The Rev’s memories of Monster Munch

Television is bad for your eyes

Big Finish “Tom Baker at 80″ CD

Donald Sinden

Don Estelle played the character of Lofty in shockingly unpolitically correct BBC TV sitcom “It Ain’t Half Hot, Mum” from the 1970s. He also had a hit singing “Whispering Grass”.

Robert Goodman chats to Toby Hadoke and Alan Moore & Mitch Jenkins present Jimmy’s End.

The Rivers of London books by Ben Aaronovitch

“The Tall Guy” by Richard Curtis

We discovered Missy’s secret identity by a rather circuitous route. There are vague similarities in Series 8’s portrayal of Coal Hill School to current BBC school-based series “Waterloo Road” and that staple of British childhood TV for 30 years “Grange Hill”. Mrs McClusky was the headmistress of Grange Hill for years. The show’s opening credits inspired some of the artwork accompanying this podcast. Super-scary Grange Hill teacher, Mr Bronson, played by Michael Sheard (Doctor Who passim).  First Mclusky,  Then Came Bronson (if only in Al’s fevered mind).

Kevin the annoying teenager

Whoniverse timeline website

Steve Moore discusses Abslom Daak

Living legend Kiran Shah

Oedipus Rex condensed

Man Alive

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

DIDDLY DUM 019 – Deep into the Dalek

With Deep Breath and Into the Dalek, the Three Who Drool finally get around to reviewing new TV episodes of Doctor Who. We initially travel to Mancini’s Family Restaurant for the first story, armed with umbrellas against the missing roof and a tube of Pringles in the absence of even a children’s menu. Later, inspired partly by the Doctor and Clara diving into the Dalek but mostly by The Numskulls comic strip, Al and The Rev shrink themselves down to fit inside Doc’s bonded polycardboard box.

In the course of our discussion, we blow wide open Steven Moffat’s secret plan to use the first Doctor of the new regeneration cycle to reboot the series back to the era of the First Doctor. But not the First Doctor you may be thinking of.

We also look at the significance of the female thorax in Sontaran lore. The Rev tells us about a friend of his who once had a date with a gibbon. Al explores a possible narrative link between the Meddling Monk and the Mondasian Cybermen. Doc advocates punches in retaliation for slaps.

 

Direct Download Link: DDPC019 – Deep Into the Dalek

Listen/download on iTunes

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All artwork for the Diddly Dum Podcast by our own The Rev can be found collected here on Pinterest.

THE DIDDLY DUM WHOSEUM CAN BE VISITED HERE.

Email us at diddlydumpodcast@yahoo.co.uk

 

SHOW NOTES

Tom Jones – “It’s Not Unusual”.

Peter Capaldi on “The One Show” – Part One and Part Two.

South Korean painting of Peter Capaldi & Jenna Coleman.

42 to Doomsday podcast reviews the Australian leg of the world tour.

Crossing the International Date Line.

Draughtsperson

The Paternoster Gang as the UNIT family – an idea we heard on The Pharos Project podcast.

“Coupling” by Steven Moffat

Doc’s bonded polycardboard box

The Numskulls is a comic strip that started in The Beezer, before jumping to The Beano and finally landing in The (digital) Dandy where it’s still going strong today.

Steven Moffat explains why he’ll never bring back The Rani.

Waterloo Road

Peter Capaldi’s butter advert

Dramaturgy is a sociological perspective starting from symbolic interactionism and commonly used in microsociological accounts of social interaction in everyday life. At least, that’s what Al thinks. And here’s one on the Reality-Tunnel: How Beliefs And Expectations Create What You Experience In Life. Doc needed a lie-down after reading them.

Doc blogs on Murray Gold’s “Unexpectedly Cold Bath Choir”.

“This is evil refined as engineering” brings to mind the Castrol GTX adverts. Those of us approaching middle age never listened to the 2nd Movement of Mahler’s 7th Symphony in the same way again.

How pink and blue became gender-specific.

 

The Diddly Dum podcast thanks anyone we’ve pinched stuff from and respects the copyright of etc etc.

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